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Patterns and tutorials

Inset Circle Tutorial

The project I have been working on has seven inset circles. While I love the look, it can be overwhelming. The project is designed to teach curves and help quilters overcome their fear of curves and inset circles. After making all my circles and fitting them into the quilt, here is my approach to inset circles and all of the tips I can think of to take the fear out of circles.

TIP: Take your time. Making inset circles is not fast. You will get a bit faster as you get more comfortable with them, but it is not fast. Put on some non-distracting music, take a deep breath and take your time.

TIP: Use a lot of starch. I find that if the fabric is not starched enough, it distorts more when I sew the inset circle.

I start by heavily starching both the background and circle fabrics. For this tutorial, I will be making a 10 inch finished circle, set into a 10.5 inch block. Cut an 11 inch square of the circle fabric (off-white) and a 12 inch square of the background fabric (aqua).

I really like this EZ Circle Cut template. But you can use any half or quarter circle that is accurate. For a 10 inch diameter finished circle, you will cut a 9.5 inch circle out of the middle of the 12 inch square. On this template, you fold the fabric in half, put the fold on the fold line and cut at the 9 inch groove.

The circle fabric needs to be bigger than the cut out from the background. For a 10 inch diameter finished circle, a 10.5 inch diameter circle needs to be cut. On this ruler, you fold the fabric in half, put the fold on the fold line and cut at the 10 inch groove.

Once your background and circle are cut, fold each separately into equal quarters and press lightly with the iron to mark the quarters as you can see below.

Start by folding the background fabric so that the fabrics are right side together and the circle is laying flat. Pin the quarter marks of the background to the quarter marks of the circle.

Then pin around the circle to make sure that the fabric is equally distributed and is not pleated or kinked. Pin from the background side.

TIP: I find that fine or very fine pins work best.

Some people swear by glue basting instead of pinning, but it has never worked well for me.

I find that it works best if I sew with the circle side down. Bernie, my sewing machine, is set up so the needle stops in the down position, and with the stitch length at 2, slightly shorter than the usual 2.5 stitch length. I always check my bobbin and my tension before I start sewing a set-in circle.

Stitch slowly until you come to the first pin. Pull the pin, use your finger to check that the fabric is laying flat, and slowly stitch to the next pin. Repeat all the way around the circle.

Secure your stitch at the end by backstitching or taking a number of tiny stitches.

After sewing, clip the seam allowance no more than 1/2 of the way to the seam. I usually clip about every inch around the circle.

After clipping all the way around, finger press the seam allowance toward the background.

Then press lightly all the way around, making sure the seam allowance is toward the background.

Then I spray the circle with water and press heavily to remove the quarter lines and finish the block.

Once the block is pressed and cooled, remove from the ironing board and take to the cutting board.

Measure 10.5 inches square, leaving 1/4 inch seam allowance around each side of the circle, as shown above. Trim.

That’s it – you now have a 10.5 inch block with a 10 inch diameter inset circle. It will make a 10 inch finished block with a fully inset circle.

Categories
Patterns and tutorials

Double Mitered Borders Tutorial

A friend recently shared that one of her quilting goals for 2021 is to master the mitered borders. I have found that making multiple mitered borders is just as easy as a single border, so I thought I would share my process with you.

Step 1: Sew the inner border pieces to the outer border pieces using a scant ¼ inch seam. The top/bottom borders should be the width of the quilt + twice the width of the border +1 inch. For example, if the quilt is 50 inches wide, the inner border is 1 inch wide and the outer border is 4 inches wide the length of the top/bottom borders should be 60 inches: 50 + (2 x 1 inch) + (2 x 4 inches) + 1 inch = 50+2+8+1. The right/left side borders should be the length of the quilt + twice the width of the border + 1 inch.

Press the seam allowance of two strips toward the inner border (place on sides of quilt) and two strips towards the outer border (place on top and bottom of quilt).

Find the center of each border unit by folding it in half. Mark with a pin. For top/bottom borders, measure 1/2 the width of the quilt on either side of the center mark and pin. Then fold the end pin to the center pin to find the quarter mark and mark with pins. You should have five pins. For example, if your side is 25 inches the pins would be placed like this:

Step 2: Pin the quilt top and borders.

Find the center of each side, the top and bottom top and mark with a pin. Find the midway point between the center and end on either side and mark with a pin, as above. Align the center and quarters of the border with the centers of the top and pin at marks. Align end point of top with outer pins on border strip and pin. Pin rest of borders to top.

You should have border fabric left on either end of the quilt top.

IMPORTANT – Mark the quilt top on the wrong side with a dot 1/4 inch from each corner. Start sewing at one 1/4 inch mark and stop stitching at the mark ¼ inch before the end of the top. Backstitch at beginning and end of seam one or two stitches. Sew all four border pieces to top leaving ¼ inch unsewn on each strip at every corner.

Press seams toward the quilt top.

Step 3: Making the miter.

A B C

Lay the quilt on ironing board with the finished side down (A). Fold quilt diagonally as shown (B) so the back side of the quilt is showing (C). NOTE: the A1, A2, B1 and B marks on the illustration are for reference only, you do not need to add these marks to your quilt. Line up the borders from the two sides aligning the marks 1/4 inch from the edge of the quilt top (C).

Align the border strips. Mark the border at a 45 degree angle, as shown (C). Pin, matching creased lines and seams. Slowly machine baste from backstitching point to outer edge of quilt.

Press seam open and check accuracy with 45-degree rule. If it is accurate, sew over basting stitch , from backstitching point to outer edge of the quilt. Remember to backstitch one or two stitches at beginning and end of this seam because it will be the outer edge of the quilt. Remove basting stitch. Trim the seam allowance to approximate ¼ inch. Repeat this process for the other three corners.

That’s it – a double mitered border!

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Patterns and tutorials Uncategorized

Opportunities

I am so excited! This week I heard from the Electric Quilt Company that my submission in the October EQ8 Design Challenge – the Good Vibes challenge, was selected by Benartex as one of this month’s winning designs! You can see the announcement here and the original challenge with all of the entries here. I am particularly excited because I really love the Good Vibes fabric line from Christa Watson (also known as Christa Quilts).

Good vibes bundle from Benartex

I would like to encourage all of you that use EQ8 to participate in some of these monthly Design Challenges. I started trying them in January to learn how to use the EQ8 program my daughter gave me for Christmas, and to practice my design skills. This is the first design contest or challenge that I have ever won, so even though it may seem like a small little thing to you, to me it is a great opportunity.

Aren’t these fun? I can’t wait to get started!

So what does this have to do with UFOs? It gives me another project to get started. And another pattern to write up. This is another of my cocktail quilts based on the Drunkard’s Path block. In this instance it is distorted to be taller and skinnier, so I think it needs a name of a cocktail that fits in the tall, skinny Tom Collins glass. Maybe “Zombie” or “Singapore Sling”. What would you name this quilt?

Categories
Patterns and tutorials

100 Day Quilt-a-Long

Here are the full instructions for the #100qal, currently on Instagram.

This is a super easy, semi-improvisational quilt with few corners to match. It works well with scraps, jelly rolls or yardage and uses 2.5 inch wide strips.

If you are like me and have been cutting your scraps into 2.5 inch strips for 5 years, you may have enough in your stash, or you may need to supplement.

All fabrics should be cut to exactly 2.5 inches wide. Seam allowances are calculated into fabric needed.  **If you use precuts, make sure they are 2.5 inches or cut them to size.

 KingQueenTwinThrowBaby
Dimensions104 x 96 in.88 x 96 in.64 x 88 in.49 x 64 in.32 x 48 in.
Columns (column width)4 (26 in.)4 (22 in.)4 (16 in.)2 (24.5 in.)2 (16 in.)
 Rows48484432
Choose one of theseYardage18 yards15.5 yards10 yards5.5 yards
Jelly Rolls6.55.5421
40 inch strips130110734020
Inches of strips5088432029041600792

The primary directions are for a king or queen sized quilt. Other sizes will finish faster:

  • King or Queen 96 days of strips = 4 days to assemble
  • Twin 88 days of strips = 12 days to assemble (or a 90-day project)
  • Throw 64 days of strips = 36 days to assemble (or a 70-day project)
  • Baby 48 days of strips = 52 days to assemble (or a 50-day project (you could make 2!)

Requires two contrasting fabric choices. About half of the fabric should be foreground color (A) and about half background color (B). You can use darks and lights, colors and neutrals, two different colors, etc. Decide which fabric you want as dominant – you will need a little more of this fabric.

I am using up my stash of strips and have approximately half that are cream or white and half that are purple, blue or teal (guess which colors I use most).

Piecing Days 1-24, 26-49, 51-74, 76-99

Sew one A to one B piece, end to end. Sew second A to second B piece, end to end.

Cut so both strips are 26.5 (22.5, 16.5, 25, 16.5) inches wide – vary cuts so light and dark are not the same length. The effect is best if the dominant color is at least 1/2 of the strip length. Use the remainder for another day. Each strip should have one A and one B piece after trimming.

 A B
 B A

Sew strip 1 to strip 2 lengthwise.

 A B
 B A

That’s it!

Assembly Days 25, 50, 75, 100

Every 24 days (24, 22, 16, 12), you will have enough strip units to assemble a column for your quilt.      

To assemble:

Layout your strips until you like the combination. Alternate A on right with B on right as shown.

BA
AB
BA
AB

Sew strips into columns first:

For baby quilt – two columns of 24 rows each

For throw – two columns of 32 rows each

For twin – four columns of 44 rows each

For queen and king – four columns of 48 rows each.

Then sew columns together, matching corners.

Add a border if you wish. Your top is done and ready for basting, quilting and binding!